An AT&T sign on the outside of a building.
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/ An AT&T indication outside a business workplace in New york city City.

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AT&T will quickly provide 5G mobile service on its 850 MHz spectrum, which will allow larger protection than existing 5G networks however provide just 4G-like speeds at launch. Substantial speed boosts will show up in 2020, AT&T states.

The 5G networks currently released by providers utilize millimeter-wave signals that do not take a trip far and are quickly obstructed by walls and other barriers. This has actually led to protection maps with little pockets of 5G, and 4G almost all over else.

However 5G can deal with all frequencies, such as the lower-band frequencies utilized by 4G. There isn’t as much spectrum readily available on these bands, so you will not see anything like the big speed increases readily available on millimeter-wave spectrum. However 5G on low-band spectrum will cover larger locations and indoor areas and ideally bring some speed increases– Verizon states 5G on the lower bands will resemble “ excellent 4G

AT&T’s statement today noted the very first cities slated to get 5G on low-band spectrum:

In the coming weeks, our 5G network will release over low-band spectrum in the Indianapolis; Pittsburgh; Providence, Rhode Island; Rochester, New York City; and San Diego market locations. We likewise prepare to release in numerous more markets, consisting of Boston; Las Vegas; Milwaukee; New York City City; San Francisco; Birmingham, Alabama; Bridgeport, Connecticut; Buffalo, New York City; Louisville, Kentucky; San Jose, California; and others.

AT&T likewise released a PDF with maps of anticipated 5G protection, however the maps are of protection predicted for February 2020 instead of what will be readily available at launch.

AT&T formerly provided millimeter-wave 5G to service consumers however not to routine customers. AT&T informed us that 5G on millimeter waves will be provided to customers “at a later date.” At first, routine customers will just have access to 5G on low-band spectrum.