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Most of us carry a “sleep debt” for at least part of the work week – we simply need more sleep than we get. The question is, can we pay off the week’s sleep debt with extra sleep on the weekends? The answer is, maybe, but there could be a penalty to pay as well.

New research from University of Colorado-Boulder researchers suggests that even if we gain a few benefits from sleeping in on the weekends, our health still takes a hit. It’s a problem of consistency.

“Our findings suggest that the common behavior of burning the candle during the week and trying to make up for it on the weekend is not an effective health strategy,” said senior study author Kenneth Wright, director of the UC-Boulder Sleep and Chronobiology Lab.

The researchers recruited 36 volunteers, ages 18 to 39, and divided them into three groups. Those in the first group slept for around nine hours a night for nine consecutive nights. Those in the second group slept for only five hours for the same number of nights. The third group was limited to five hours for the first five nights, and was then allowed to sleep as much as they wanted during the weekend, followed by two more five-hour nights.

The researchers tracked the volunteers’ eating habits during the study period and also checked their insulin sensitivity via blood tests. Previous studies have linked sleep loss to reduced insulin sensitivity, which is thought to increase chronically poor sleepers’ risk of developing diabetes. Poor sleep is also linked to obesity, partly because erratic sleep schedules lead to more nighttime snacking.

Volunteers in both of the sleep-restricted groups snacked more at night, gained weight and experienced reduced insulin sensitivity during the study period. The group allowed to sleep more on the weekend experienced a few benefits compared to the other group (they snacked less after dinner, for example) but the gains disappeared when the weekend ended and they went back to five-hour nights.

“In the end, we didn’t see any benefit in any metabolic outcome in the people who got to sleep in on the weekend,” said lead author Chris Depner, an assistant research professor of Integrative Physiology.

And in at least one significant way, the weekend sleepers had an even worse outcome. The group that slept five hours each night experienced a 13% decline in whole-body insulin sensitivity, while those in the weekend-sleeping group experienced a 9 to 27% decline, with particularly poor sensitivity in their liver and muscles. That’s concerning because poor skeletal-muscle insulin sensitivity is a major driver of type-2 diabetes.

“It could be that the yo-yoing back and forth – changing the time we eat, changing our circadian clock and then going back to insufficient sleep is uniquely disruptive,” said Wright.

So where does that leave us?

It seems the main problem with weekend sleeping is what happens on Monday. We go back into sleep-loss mode, starting the cycle over again. Plus, as we already know, sleeping more on Saturday and Sunday mornings makes getting to sleep at a decent time on Sunday night more difficult. The weekend sleepers in this study only slept an hour more, and even that was enough to throw them off.

This was a small study and it’ll need to be replicated with larger groups, but the basic findings are still instructive. Getting a little more sleep on the weekend does seem to “pay” some of the sleep debt, but it does nothing to improve sleep consistency, and that’s where the real benefits come from.

Which brings us back to the gold-standard argument for sleep: consistently getting at least seven hours a night is the best way to keep sleep and health in balance. A difficult standard to achieve, but it’s the one science points to as mattering the most.

The study was published in the journal Current Biology.

You can find David DiSalvo on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, and at his website, daviddisalvo.org.

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The majority of us bring a “sleep financial obligation” for a minimum of part of the work week– we just require more sleep than we get. The concern is, can we settle the week’s sleep financial obligation with beauty sleep on the weekends? The response is, perhaps, however there might be a charge to pay also.(*********** )

New research study from University of Colorado-Boulder scientists recommends that even if we get a couple of take advantage of oversleeping on the weekends, our health still takes a hit. It’s an issue of consistency.

” Our findings recommend that the typical habits of burning the candle light throughout the week and attempting to offset it on the weekend is not an efficient health technique,” stated senior research study author Kenneth Wright, director of the UC-Boulder Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory.

The scientists hired36 volunteers, ages18 to(************************************************* ), and divided them into 3 groups. Those in the very first group slept for around 9 hours a night for 9 successive nights. Those in the 2nd group slept for just 5 hours for the exact same variety of nights. The 3rd group was restricted to 5 hours for the very first 5 nights, and was then permitted to sleep as much as they desired throughout the weekend, followed by 2 more five-hour nights.

The scientists tracked the volunteers’ consuming routines throughout the research study duration and likewise examined their insulin level of sensitivity by means of blood tests. Previous research studies have actually connected sleep loss to lowered insulin level of sensitivity, which is believed to increase chronically bad sleepers’ threat of establishing diabetes. Poor sleep is likewise connected to weight problems, partially since irregular sleep schedules result in more nighttime snacking.

(***** )(************ )Volunteers in both of the sleep-restricted groups snacked more during the night, put on weight and experienced lowered insulin level of sensitivity throughout the research study duration. The group permitted to sleep more on the weekend experienced a couple of advantages compared to the other group (they snacked less after supper, for instance) however the gains vanished when the weekend ended and they returned to five-hour nights.

” In the end, we didn’t see any advantage in any metabolic result in individuals who got to oversleep on the weekend,” stated lead author Chris Depner, an assistant research study teacher of Integrative Physiology.

And in a minimum of one considerable method, the weekend sleepers had an even worse result. The group that slept 5 hours each night experienced a 13% decrease in whole-body insulin level of sensitivity, while those in the weekend-sleeping group experienced a 9 to 27% decrease, with especially bad level of sensitivity in their liver and muscles. That’s worrying since bad skeletal-muscle insulin level of sensitivity is a significant chauffeur of type-2 diabetes.

” It might be that the yo-yoing backward and forward– altering the time we consume, altering our circadian clock and after that returning to inadequate sleep is distinctively disruptive,” stated Wright.

So where does that leave us?

It appears the primary issue with weekend sleeping is what occurs on Monday. We return into sleep-loss mode, beginning the cycle over once again. Plus, as we currently understand, sleeping more on Saturday and Sunday early mornings makes getting to sleep at a good time on Sunday night harder The weekend sleepers in this research study just slept an hour more, and even that sufficed to toss them off.

This was a little research study and it’ll require to be reproduced with bigger groups, however the fundamental findings are still useful. Getting a little bit more sleep on the weekend does appear to “pay” a few of the sleep financial obligation, however it not does anything to enhance sleep consistency, which’s where the genuine advantages originate from.

Which brings us back to the gold-standard argument for sleep: regularly getting at least 7 hours a night is the very best method to keep sleep and health in balance. A tough requirement to accomplish, however it’s the one science indicate as mattering one of the most.

The research study was released in the journal Present Biology

You can discover David DiSalvo on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, and at his site, daviddisalvo.org

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140593561368″ >

The majority of us bring a “sleep financial obligation” for a minimum of part of the work week– we just require more sleep than we get. The concern is, can we settle the week’s sleep financial obligation with beauty sleep on the weekends? The response is, perhaps, however there might be a charge to pay also.

New research study from University of Colorado-Boulder scientists recommends that even if we get a couple of take advantage of oversleeping on the weekends, our health still takes a hit. It’s an issue of consistency.

“Our findings recommend that the typical habits of burning the candle light throughout the week and attempting to offset it on the weekend is not an efficient health technique,” stated senior research study author Kenneth Wright, director of the UC-Boulder Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory.

The scientists hired 36 volunteers, ages 18 to 39, and divided them into 3 groups. Those in the very first group slept for around 9 hours a night for 9 successive nights. Those in the 2nd group slept for just 5 hours for the exact same variety of nights. The 3rd group was restricted to 5 hours for the very first 5 nights, and was then permitted to sleep as much as they desired throughout the weekend, followed by 2 more five-hour nights.

The scientists tracked the volunteers’ consuming routines throughout the research study duration and likewise examined their insulin level of sensitivity by means of blood tests. Previous research studies have actually connected sleep loss to lowered insulin level of sensitivity, which is believed to increase chronically bad sleepers’ threat of establishing diabetes. Poor sleep is likewise connected to weight problems, partially since irregular sleep schedules result in more nighttime snacking.

Volunteers in both of the sleep-restricted groups snacked more during the night, put on weight and experienced lowered insulin level of sensitivity throughout the research study duration. The group permitted to sleep more on the weekend experienced a couple of advantages compared to the other group (they snacked less after supper, for instance) however the gains vanished when the weekend ended and they returned to five-hour nights.

“In the end, we didn’t see any advantage in any metabolic result in individuals who got to oversleep on the weekend,” stated lead author Chris Depner, an assistant research study teacher of Integrative Physiology.

And in a minimum of one considerable method, the weekend sleepers had an even worse result. The group that slept 5 hours each night experienced a 13 % decrease in whole-body insulin level of sensitivity, while those in the weekend-sleeping group experienced a 9 to 27 % decrease, with especially bad level of sensitivity in their liver and muscles. That’s worrying since bad skeletal-muscle insulin level of sensitivity is a significant chauffeur of type-2 diabetes.

“It might be that the yo-yoing backward and forward– altering the time we consume, altering our circadian clock and after that returning to inadequate sleep is distinctively disruptive,” stated Wright.

So where does that leave us?

It appears the primary issue with weekend sleeping is what occurs on Monday. We return into sleep-loss mode, beginning the cycle over once again. Plus, as we currently understand, sleeping more on Saturday and Sunday early mornings makes getting to sleep at a good time on Sunday night harder The weekend sleepers in this research study just slept an hour more, and even that sufficed to toss them off.

This was a little research study and it’ll require to be reproduced with bigger groups, however the fundamental findings are still useful. Getting a little bit more sleep on the weekend does appear to “pay” a few of the sleep financial obligation, however it not does anything to enhance sleep consistency, which’s where the genuine advantages originate from.

Which brings us back to the gold-standard argument for sleep: regularly getting at least 7 hours a night is the very best method to keep sleep and health in balance. A tough requirement to accomplish, however it’s the one science indicate as mattering one of the most.

The research study was released in the journal Present Biology

.

You can discover David DiSalvo on Twitter , Facebook , Google Plus , and at his site, daviddisalvo.org

.