fbpx
Saturday, November 27, 2021
11 Terrifying Things You Never Knew About the Ocean

11 Terrifying Things You Never Knew About the Ocean

0
Image: Shutterstock (Shutterstock)There is no better argument for the elimination of nature than Cymothoa Exigua. Sometimes called the “tongue-eating louse,” these soggy parasites enter the gills of an unsuspecting fish (like Dory from Finding Nemo) and attach themselves to their host’s tongue. They divert the blood supply until the tongue withers and dies, then they…
Baleen whales eat (and poop) a lot more than we realized

Baleen whales eat (and poop) a lot more than we realized

0
Whalers have plucked giant whales from the sea for much of the last century, reducing their numbers by up to 99 percent for certain species. Some scientists thought that krill — the tiny crustaceans that many whales eat in gargantuan gulps — would explode in number as a result, mostly free from the feeding pressure…
Assassin bugs tap spiders to distract them before a lethal strike

Assassin bugs tap spiders to distract them before a lethal strike

0
Assassin bugs live up to their name. The insects expertly stalk and feed upon other small invertebrates, jabbing them with a venomous proboscis. Some species even hunt spiders and use a strange trick to gain the upper hand. Using their antennae, assassin bugs tap spiders, which appears to discombobulate the arachnids long enough to let…
Flamingos dye their sun-faded feathers to stay pretty in pink

Flamingos dye their sun-faded feathers to stay pretty in pink

0
Greater flamingos apparently aren’t fans of a sun-faded look for their neck feathers. Scientists have known that the leggy birds touch up their color by smearing their necks with a serum they produce in glands in their cheeks. But greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) aren’t simply enhancing color that’s already there; they’re also fighting the sun’s…
Jumping spiders’ remarkable senses capture a world beyond our perception

Jumping spiders’ remarkable senses capture a world beyond our perception

0
Imagine that the world is shades of gray and a little blurry, almost as if your lousy peripheral vision has taken over. This fuzzy field of view extends so far that you can make out dim shapes and motion behind you as well; no need to turn your head. The one bright spot is an…
Tuskless elephants became common as an evolutionary response to poachers

Tuskless elephants became common as an evolutionary response to poachers

0
When ivory poachers target elephants, the hunters can affect more than just animal numbers. In Mozambique, past hunting pressure led to an increase of naturally tuskless elephants in one park, a study finds.  During the Mozambican Civil War, which lasted from 1977 to 1992, armies hunted elephants and other wildlife for food and ivory (SN:…
Trapped in amber: Fossilized dinosaur-era crab bridges evolutionary gap

Trapped in amber: Fossilized dinosaur-era crab bridges evolutionary gap

0
Once upon a time, during the Cretaceous period, a tiny crab wandered out of the water onto land and somehow got trapped in amber, which preserved it for 100 million years. At least that's what a team of scientists hypothesize might have happened in a new paper announcing their discovery of the oldest known modern-looking crab…
Scientists found modern domestic horses’ homeland in southwestern Russia

Scientists found modern domestic horses’ homeland in southwestern Russia

0
Much of human history was made astride, or beside, a horse. The animal’s stolid speed and strength powered massive migrations of people, pulled plows that transformed agriculture and revolutionized warfare. Now, researchers have pinpointed where and when horse and human history became intertwined. Ancient DNA reveals that the modern domestic horse originated on the vast…
An agile gecko found in India named after the legendary Jackie Chan

An agile gecko found in India named after the legendary Jackie...

0
Martial arts legend Jackie Chan may not be aware of this yet but some of his biggest fans are a group of adoring herpetologists from India. These scientists have named a newly identified gecko species, the Jackie’s day gecko (Cnemaspis jackieii), after Chan. This lizard is one of 12 new gecko species found in India…
You Can Use GPS to Track Your Pet (Because a Microchip Won’t)

You Can Use GPS to Track Your Pet (Because a Microchip...

0
Photo: Linda George (Shutterstock)Microchipping is a common practice among pet owners as a way to embed their contact information into their pet. If your pet gets lost, and then found—and the finder thinks to have the animal scanned for a chip—you will be identified and thus happily reunited with your buddy. However, in addition to…

Recent Posts