fbpx
Tuesday, February 25, 2020
Use Google and a Smartphone to Bring 3D Animals into Your Living Room

Use Google and a Smartphone to Bring 3D Animals into Your...

That’s an eagle. On my sunporch. Screenshot: Meghan Moravcik WalbertIf you—or your kids—have ever wondered how big a wolf, a shark or a tiger really is out in the wild, Google has a way to bring their 3D animated image right into your home. All you need is a little curiosity, a browser and an…
Collectors find plenty of bees but far fewer species than in the 1950s

Collectors find plenty of bees but far fewer species than in...

Far fewer bee species are buzzing across Earth today, following a steep decline in bee diversity during the last three decades, according to an analysis of bee collections and observations going back a century.   About half as many bee species are turning up in current collecting efforts for museums and other collections compared with…
A naturalist writes an homage to bird migration

A naturalist writes an homage to bird migration

A Season on the WindKenn KaufmanHoughton Mifflin Harcourt, $26 A tiny blackpoll warbler, a bird no heavier than a ballpoint pen, makes an epic journey each year. In fall, the bird flies some 10,000 kilometers from its breeding grounds in Alaska or Canada to its winter retreat in South America. In the spring, the bird…
Australian fires have incinerated the habitats of up to 100 threatened species

Australian fires have incinerated the habitats of up to 100 threatened...

Until last week, the Kangaroo Island glossy black cockatoo was one of Australia’s conservation success stories. Thanks to a recovery program that began in 1995, its wild population increased from 150 to 400, and its status was downgraded from critically endangered to endangered. Now it’s part of an unfolding horror story. Fires have raged across…
A year of big numbers startled the world into talking about nature

A year of big numbers startled the world into talking about...

Some big numbers from nature made news in 2019. They were enough of a shock to get people talking about the dwindling diversity of plants, animals and other life on Earth, and what to do about it. Some of that dramatic news came from the Amazon, where satellites picked up signs of a very active…
Texas has its own rodeo ant queens

Texas has its own rodeo ant queens

Alex Wild has discovered new rodeo ants in, of course, Texas. The shiny little reddish Solenopsis ants grip tight and ride the backs of big queen ants of a different species. It’s not, however, just random piggyback fun. The little riders hang on with mouthparts that have evolved a snug fit around the waist of…
A biochemist’s extraction of data from honey honors her beekeeper father

A biochemist’s extraction of data from honey honors her beekeeper father

WASHINGTON — One scientist’s sweet tribute to her father may one day give beekeepers clues about their colonies’ health, as well as help warn others when crop diseases or pollen allergies are about to strike. Those are all possible applications that biochemistry researcher Rocío Cornero of George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., sees for her…
Why some whales are giants and others are just big

Why some whales are giants and others are just big

Sophisticated sensors suction-cupped onto the backs of whales are helping biologists answer two long-standing questions: Why are whales so big? And why aren’t they bigger? Being big in general boosts whales’ ability to reach more food for less effort, helping them exploit the riches of the deep sea that are beyond the reach of many…
Devil worm genes hold clues for how some animals survive extreme heat

Devil worm genes hold clues for how some animals survive extreme...

You might expect a “devil worm” to have fiery eyes and a forked tail — or horns, at the very least. But under the microscope, Halicephalobus mephisto looks nothing like its nickname. Measuring a scant half of a millimeter, it’s a little squiggle of a critter. “There’s nothing particularly menacing about them,” says John Bracht,…
Humpback whales in the South Atlantic have actually recuperated from near-extinction

Humpback whales in the South Atlantic have actually recuperated from near-extinction

Once hunted almost to extinction, the population of humpback whales that swims the seas between South America and Antarctica has bounced back. An estimated 25,000 Megaptera novaeangliae now live in the western South Atlantic. That’s about 93 percent of the population’s prehunt levels, which also were updated by a new counting method, researchers report October…

Recent Posts