fbpx
Saturday, September 26, 2020
50 years ago, scientists clocked the speed of Antarctic ice

50 years ago, scientists clocked the speed of Antarctic ice

0
Soviet research in Antarctica, Science News, August 22 & 29, 1970 — There is a hypothesis that the Great Antarctic [Ice] Shield is gradually sliding into the sea at a rate of about 330 feet a year.… To learn how much ice is accumulated and how much of it slides off the continent, scientists set…
Death Valley hits 130° F, the hottest recorded temperature on Earth since 1931

Death Valley hits 130° F, the hottest recorded temperature on Earth...

0
Amid a sweltering heat wave across the western United States, a remote spot in Death Valley, Calif., may have just earned the title of hottest place on Earth in nearly a century. On August 16, the Death Valley spot — appropriately named Furnace Creek, with a population of 24 — logged a temperature of 130°…
Predictions for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season just got worse

Predictions for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season just got worse

0
Chalk up one more way 2020 could be an especially stressful year: The Atlantic hurricane season now threatens to be even more severe than preseason forecasts predicted, and may be one of the busiest on record. With as many as 25 named storms now expected — twice the average number — 2020 is shaping up…
COVID-19 lockdowns dramatically reduced seismic noise from humans

COVID-19 lockdowns dramatically reduced seismic noise from humans

Widespread global lockdowns resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the amount of seismic noise produced by humans by up to 50 percent in some places, a new study finds. This 2020 seismic noise quiet period began in late January and hit its peak from March to May. It was the longest and most prominent reduction…
An asteroid impact, not volcanism, may have made Earth unlivable for dinosaurs

An asteroid impact, not volcanism, may have made Earth unlivable for...

For decades, scientists have gone back and forth about whether massive volcanic eruptions or an asteroid impact — or maybe both — caused a mass extinction that saw the demise of all nonbird dinosaurs about 66 million years ago. Now, geologic evidence and data on dinosaur habitats, combined with climate and ecological simulations, suggest it…
Agriculture and fossil fuels are driving record-high methane emissions

Agriculture and fossil fuels are driving record-high methane emissions

Methane levels in the atmosphere are at an all-time high. But curbing emissions of that potent greenhouse gas requires knowing where methane is being released, and why. Now, a global inventory of methane sources reveals the major culprits behind rising methane pollution in the 21st century. Agriculture, landfill waste and fossil fuel use were the…
Earth’s annual e-waste could grow to 75 million metric tons by 2030

Earth’s annual e-waste could grow to 75 million metric tons by...

The planet’s hefty pile of discarded electronics is getting a lot heavier, a new report finds. In 2014, the world collectively tossed an estimated 44.4 million metric tons of unwanted “e-waste” — battery-powered or plug-tethered devices such as laptops, smartphones and televisions. By 2030, that number is projected to grow to about 74.7 million tons,…
Two lightning megaflashes shattered distance and duration records

Two lightning megaflashes shattered distance and duration records

Two extreme bolts of lightning have smashed previous records for lightning duration and distance. A bolt that lit up the sky over Argentina on March 4, 2019, lasted a mind-boggling 16.73 seconds, more than twice as long as the previous record holder, the World Meteorological Organization announced June 25. Meanwhile, a lightning bolt on October…
Machine learning helped demystify a California earthquake swarm

Machine learning helped demystify a California earthquake swarm

Circulating groundwater triggered a four-year-long swarm of tiny earthquakes that rumbled beneath the Southern California town of Cahuilla, researchers report in the June 19 Science. By training computers to recognize such faint rumbles, the scientists were able not only to identify the probable culprit behind the quakes, but also to track how such mysterious swarms…
Smoke from Australian fires rose higher into the ozone layer than ever before

Smoke from Australian fires rose higher into the ozone layer than...

Australia’s most recent wildfire season was so severe that smoke from the fires reached new heights in the atmosphere — and showed some very weird behavior while it was up there. A particularly intense series of bushfires in southeastern Australia from December 29 to January 4 spurred the formation of huge pyrocumulonimbus, or pyroCb, clouds…

Recent Posts