fbpx
Wednesday, November 13, 2019
Microsoft chooses secret Flash whitelist after Google explains its insecurity

Microsoft chooses secret Flash whitelist after Google explains its insecurity

In 2017, Microsoft changed its Edge browser so that Flash content would be click-to-run (or disabled outright) on virtually every site on the Web. A handful of sites were to be whitelisted, however, due to a combination of Flash dependence and high popularity. The whitelist was intended to make it easier to move to a…
Google isn’t the business that we must have handed the Web over to

Google isn’t the business that we must have handed the Web...

With Microsoft's decision to end development of its own Web rendering engine and switch to Chromium, control over the Web has functionally been ceded to Google. That's a worrying turn of events, given the company's past behavior. Chrome itself has about 72 percent of the desktop-browser market share. Edge has about 4 percent. Opera, based…
Edge passes away a death of a thousand cuts as Microsoft changes to Chromium

Edge passes away a death of a thousand cuts as Microsoft...

As reported earlier this week, Microsoft is going to use Google's Blink rendering engine and V8 JavaScript engine in its Edge browser, largely ending development of its own EdgeHTML rendering engine and Chakra JavaScript engine. This means that Microsoft will be using code from—and making contributions to—the Chromium open source project. The company's browser will…
Report: Microsoft is ditching Edge, changing to simply another Chrome clone

Report: Microsoft is ditching Edge, changing to simply another Chrome clone

Getty / Aurich Windows Central reports that Microsoft is planning to replace its Edge browser, which uses Microsoft's own EdgeHTML rendering engine and Chakra JavaScript engine, with a new browser built on Chromium, the open source counterpart to Google's Chrome. The new browser has the codename Anaheim. The report is short on details. The easiest…
Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla come together to end TLS 1.0

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla come together to end TLS 1.0

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla have announced a unified plan to deprecate the use of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 early in 2020. TLS (Transport Layer Security) is used to secure connections on the Web. TLS is essential to the Web, providing the ability to form connections that are confidential, authenticated, and tamper-proof. This has made…
966,708FansLike
62,244FollowersFollow
5,690SubscribersSubscribe

Recent Posts