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Monday, September 27, 2021
Ancient human beings utilized the moon as a calendar in the sky

Ancient human beings utilized the moon as a calendar in the...

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The sun’s rhythm may have set the pace of each day, but when early humans needed a way to keep time beyond a single day and night, they looked to a second light in the sky. The moon was one of humankind’s first timepieces long before the first written language, before the earliest organized cities…
Ancient DNA exposes the origins of the Philistines

Ancient DNA exposes the origins of the Philistines

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Hard-won genetic clues from the bones of Philistines, a people known from the Old Testament for their battles with Israelites, have taken some of the mystery out of their hazy origins. DNA extracted from the remains of 10 individuals buried at Ashkelon, an ancient Philistine port city in Israel, displays molecular links to ancient and…
East Asians might have been improving their skulls 12,000 years ago

East Asians might have been improving their skulls 12,000 years ago

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Ancient tombs in China have produced what may be some of the oldest known human skulls to be intentionally reshaped. At a site called Houtaomuga, scientists unearthed 25 skeletons dating to between around 12,000 years ago and 5,000 years ago. Of those, 11 featured skulls with artificially elongated braincases and flattened bones at the front…
Immigrants might have dominated ancient Egypt without attacking it

Immigrants might have dominated ancient Egypt without attacking it

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CLEVELAND — A mysterious foreign dynasty that ruled ancient Egypt for about a century gained power not by force, as often thought, but by marrying into royalty, new evidence suggests. Hyksos people, thought to have come from somewhere in West Asia, reigned as Egypt’s 15th dynasty from around 3,650 to 3,540 years ago. Although later,…
Paint specks in tooth tartar light up a middle ages female’s artistry

Paint specks in tooth tartar light up a middle ages female’s...

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Remnants of a rare pigment found in dental tartar of a woman buried around 1,000 years ago at a medieval monastery indicate that she may have been an elite scribe or book painter. These pigment flecks come from ultramarine, a rare blue pigment made by grinding lapis lazuli stone imported from Afghanistan into powder, say…

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