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Sunday, January 26, 2020
When reading Science News is the habit of a lifetime

When reading Science News is the habit of a lifetime

On November 8, we welcomed a visitor to the Science News office in Washington, D.C. Kevin W. Parker brought with him a faded copy of the Nov. 8, 1969 issue of Science News — his first issue in what is now a 50-year-plus habit of reading our magazine to keep up with the latest developments…
Readers question carbon nanotube transistors and brain organoids

Readers question carbon nanotube transistors and brain organoids

Chip off the old carbon block Scientists built the first microprocessor that uses thousands of carbon nanotube transistors, Maria Temming reported in “A chip made with carbon nanotubes, not silicon, marks a computing milestone” (SN: 9/28/19, p. 7). Reddit user SchwarzerKaffee asked about the environmental impact of producing carbon-based microprocessors versus standard silicon-based ones. Making…
Issue fixing and the power of mankind

Issue fixing and the power of mankind

In 1983, AIDS was a death sentence. The HIV virus had just been identified as the cause of a terrifying disease that was killing young, previously healthy people. Even though scientists had determined that the disease could not be spread by casual contact, people with HIV were shunned. In 1985, 13-year-old Ryan White was barred…
Readers contemplate distinctions in polio vaccines and more

Readers contemplate distinctions in polio vaccines and more

Vaccine varieties Polio is close to being eradicated worldwide, but the virus still circulates in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Tina Hesman Saey reported (SN: 9/14/19, p. 4) in an update to a 1969 story, “Polio could come back” (SN: 9/13/69, p. 206). In African countries, one source of polio cases are vaccines made with viral strains…
Combating hardship and the deep roots of inequality

Combating hardship and the deep roots of inequality

In 2018, income inequality in the United States reached its highest level since the Census Bureau started studying it in 1967, despite the longest sustained period of economic growth in American history. The issue has become a flash point, with presidential contenders Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren arguing for a wealth tax, while attacks on…
Mice fidget. Those movements have huge impacts on their brains

Mice fidget. Those movements have huge impacts on their brains

Survey any office, and you’ll see pens tapping, heels bouncing and hair being twiddled. But jittery humans aren’t alone. Mice also fidget while they work. What’s more, this seemingly useless motion has a profound and widespread effect on mice’s brain activity, neuroscientist Anne Churchland of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York and colleagues report…
Readers inquire about aging understandings, reef and more

Readers inquire about aging understandings, reef and more

Aging mind-set Subtle messages that can shift perceptions of aging in older people from negative to positive might lead to better health, Robin Marantz Henig reported in “Positive attitudes about aging may pay off in better health” (SN: 8/3/19, p. 22). One study reported in the story found that older people exposed subliminally to positive…
Have a look at us now!

Have a look at us now!

When Science News first went online in 1996, about one-fifth of Americans had access to the internet, and those who did spent very little time there. Dial-up modems were painfully slow. AOL was the largest internet service provider, and Amazon was a start-up online bookseller. In those early days, journalists quickly realized how great the…
What would take place if you never ever rose

What would take place if you never ever rose

Following is a transcript of the video. Forty-three percent of Americans say they're too tired to function. So, odds are, you're pretty exhausted. Some mornings, you might even fantasize about staying in bed...forever. Hey, look, your wish came true! You've got food, a bedpan, and an endless stream of podcasts to binge. Everything you need…
Who Owns the Moon?

Who Owns the Moon?

Most likely, this is the best-known picture of a flag ever taken: Buzz Aldrin standing next to the first U.S. flag planted on the Moon. For those who knew their world history, it also rang some alarm bells. Only less than a century ago, back on Earth, planting a national flag in another part of…

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