Main American migrants, wanting to request for asylum in the United States, are being transferred to a short-lived shelter in Tijuana, Mexico. Volunteers from San Diego check out the migrants weekly to aid with healthcare.

GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images.


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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images.

Main American migrants, wanting to request for asylum in the United States, are being transferred to a short-lived shelter in Tijuana, Mexico. Volunteers from San Diego check out the migrants weekly to aid with healthcare.

GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images.

The Trump administration revealed this previous week that asylum-seekers would no longer be launched into this nation while their claims are being processed. Rather, they will be returned to Mexico to wait for a hearing prior to a migration judge.

There are currently thousands in Mexico, waiting simply to ask for asylum.

In Tijuana, a caravan of Main American migrants got here last month and are presently residing in close quarters in shelters. As temperature levels drop, there are issues about the migrants’ health. So, when a week, a group of medical professionals, nurses and volunteers cross the border from San Diego to supply treatment.

Nurse specialist Karen Linares is among those volunteers. When Linares found out about the migrant caravan in Tijuana, she felt an individual connection to the countless Central Americans waiting in Tijuana. She was embraced from Honduras at as a 7-year-old.

Maturing in Oregon, she stated she constantly wished to begin a medical center in Honduras and operate in medication. She’s now 39, and living in Palm Springs. Through a facebook post, she found out about the volunteer job, and instantly registered.

” Feeling in one’s bones that my raza[are here], which resembles my individuals from my nation, I felt I was bound to come,” she states. Linares drove 2 and a half hours on a Sunday to sign up with the group of about a lots medical volunteers.

Numerous migrants are now residing in big government-run shelters that are serviced by Mexican federal government health-care specialists. However there’s likewise a variety of casual shelters in the city, where there’s little to no healthcare. So that’s where Linares and the others focus their attention.

This day, the group went to a personal house that now acts as an LGBTQ shelter, to examine about 25 clients. A 20- year-old male was experiencing stress headaches and body pains. Among the medical professionals, Lucy Horton, handed him Tylenol and asked him if he was worried. He nodded his head.

” Do you have any household with you?”, Horton asked. “Are you simply on your own?”

The male responded to, “Si,” and started to weep.

” Well you have actually made it truly far,” the medical professional stated, attempting to comfort him.

Household medication Dr. Julie Lu Do of San Diego collects medication and products prior to the group goes out to deal with migrants. She becomes part of a group of volunteers who decrease to Tijuana weekly to aid with healthcare.

Alyssa Jeong Perry/KPCC.


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Alyssa Jeong Perry/KPCC.

Household medication Dr. Julie Lu Do of San Diego collects medication and products prior to the group goes out to deal with migrants. She becomes part of a group of volunteers who decrease to Tijuana weekly to aid with healthcare.

Alyssa Jeong Perry/KPCC.

Diana Aguirre was on hand to aid with translations for the medical professional. Like Linares, Aguirre felt an individual connection to offer on this journey. She was born in the U.S. and resides in northern San Diego county. However her grandma and mom unlawfully crossed the Mexico-U.S. border years earlier.

” I wished to do more than simply contribute cash. I wished to do something hands on,” stated Aguirre.

However she didn’t understand it would be such a psychological effect.

” I can’t envision being young and feeling all alone and not understanding what’s going to occur,” she included, choking up.” Simply to be there for him deserved the whole day.”

Besides going to the LGBTQ shelter, the group went from makeshift shelters to camping tent camps to supply fundamental treatment. In all, they looked after more than 100 migrants in a day.

The medical professionals given out cold medication, ibuprofen and prescription antibiotics that they bought in Tijuana with cash from contributions. Usually, they deal with colds, fevers and upper breathing infections. However the care and medication they supply is important to avoiding any infections that might spread out like wildfire throughout the overcrowded camps and shelters. The group likewise keeps track of for any signs of a possible break out of extremely transmittable illness like measles or chickenpox. If they see anything, they flag it to the Mexican federal government.

The medical group typically learns by word of mouth where treatment is most required– like at a YMCA in the middle of town that houses teens.

17- year-old Radonis was remaining there. He asked that we do not utilize his complete name out of security issues. He’s from Honduras and states he got here in Tijuana after having taking a trip through Mexico by riding on top of trains and by strolling. Prior to he got to the shelter, he slept on the beaches in Tijuana. Today he has a deep cough.

” From Mexico City to here, I was ill,” he stated in Spanish. “I had whatever, a cold. I was truly ill.”

So the medical professionals hand him some cough drops. And in the meantime, he has time to recover in a safe location.

” I seem like I’m house,” Radonis included, “I’m enhancing every day.”