A Michigan “ghost apple.”Andrew Sietsema

Well there’s something you don’t see every day: icy casing of apples hanging off a tree. Rather appropriately, they’ve been given the moniker “ghost apples”, but what the heck are they?

Currently going viral on Twitter, these rather striking features were spotted in West Michigan by one Andrew Sietsema, who posted the images on his Facebook page. He told me that he’s not quite sure how they formed, but suspects that after some rather cold conditions and plenty of chilly rainfall, the surface of the apples froze over. The apples themselves, which are resistant to temperatures that freeze water to a greater extent, remained intact.

A very rare set of environmental circumstances must have been at play here.Andrew Sietsema

Later, it was just warm enough to allow the encased apples to take on some of that water and turn into a mush. “When I pruned a tree it would be shaken in the process, and the mush would slip out of the bottom of the ‘ghost apple’,” he explained. “Most apples just fell off, ice and all. But quite a few would leave a cool ‘ghost apple’ behind.”

As these apples happen to be of the Jonagold variety, Sietsema has come to calling them “Jonaghosts.”

Has this phenomenon been seen anywhere else before?Andrew Sietsema

As far as I can tell, this phenomenon hasn’t really been seen before. During a brief Twitter exchange, I wondered if botanist extraordinaire James Wong had seen anything like this before, to which he replied: “No!” before noting that he isn’t sure how a frozen apple would rot and fall out of the casing like that.

Some of you may be wondering if this is too good to be true. Are they legitimately real things, or is this a rather glorious sleight of hand? At this point, I can’t say for sure. If there are any horticulturalists out there that might have any insight as to how these apples formed, or how rare the set of circumstances need to be for ghost apples to appear, please do get in touch.

Sietsema, who studied horticulture himself at Michigan State University, said that he understands that the pictures might provoke some skepticism because they are certainly quite strange. Saying that, he says that he’s sure it’s happened before, but added that “most pruners are hard at work instead of taking pictures like me.”

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A Michigan” ghost apple.” Andrew Sietsema

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Well there’s something you do not see every day: icy case of apples hanging off a tree. Rather properly, they’ve been offered the name “ghost apples”, however what the heck are they?

Currently going viral on Twitter, these rather striking functions were identified in West Michigan by one Andrew Sietsema, who published the images on his Facebook page He informed me that he’s not rather sure how they formed, however believes that after some rather cold conditions and lots of cold rains, the surface area of the apples froze over. The apples themselves, which are resistant to temperature levels that freeze water to a higher degree, stayed undamaged.

A really unusual set of ecological scenarios need to have been at play here. Andrew Sietsema

Later On, it was simply warm sufficient to permit the encased apples to handle a few of that water and become a mush. “When I pruned a tree it would be shaken at the same time, and the mush would slip out of the bottom of the ‘ghost apple’,” he described. “The majority of apples simply fell off, ice and all. However several would leave a cool ‘ghost apple’ behind.”

As these apples take place to be of the Jonagold range, Sietsema has actually concerned calling them “Jonaghosts.”

(******* )(******** )Has this phenomenon been seen anywhere else prior to? Andrew Sietsema

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As far as I can inform, this phenomenon hasn’t actually been seen prior to. Throughout a short Twitter exchange, I questioned if botanist extraordinaire James Wong had actually seen anything like this prior to, to which he responded: ” No!” prior to keeping in mind that he isn’t sure how a frozen apple would rot and fall out of the casing like that.

A few of you might be questioning if this is too great to be real. Are they legally genuine things, or is this a rather marvelous deception? At this moment, I can’t state for sure. If there are any horticulturalists out there that may have any insight regarding how these apples formed, or how unusual the set of scenarios require to be for ghost apples to appear, please do contact us.

Sietsema, who studied gardening himself at Michigan State University, stated that he comprehends that the photos may provoke some hesitation since they are definitely rather unusual. Stating that, he states that he makes sure it’s taken place previously, however included that ” most pruners are difficult at work rather of taking photos like me.”

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A Michigan “ghost apple.” Andrew Sietsema

.

.

Well there’s something you do not see every day: icy case of apples hanging off a tree. Rather properly, they’ve been offered the name “ghost apples”, however what the heck are they?

Presently going viral on Twitter, these rather striking functions were identified in West Michigan by one Andrew Sietsema, who published the images on his Facebook page He informed me that he’s not rather sure how they formed, however believes that after some rather cold conditions and lots of cold rains, the surface area of the apples froze over. The apples themselves, which are resistant to temperature levels that freeze water to a higher degree, stayed undamaged.

.

.

A really unusual set of ecological scenarios need to have been at play here. Andrew Sietsema

.

.

Later On, it was simply warm sufficient to permit the encased apples to handle a few of that water and become a mush. “When I pruned a tree it would be shaken at the same time, and the mush would slip out of the bottom of the ‘ghost apple’,” he described. “The majority of apples simply fell off, ice and all. However several would leave a cool ‘ghost apple’ behind.”

As these apples take place to be of the Jonagold range, Sietsema has actually concerned calling them “Jonaghosts.”

.

.

Has this phenomenon been seen anywhere else prior to? Andrew Sietsema

.

.

As far as I can inform, this phenomenon hasn’t actually been seen prior to. Throughout a short Twitter exchange, I questioned if botanist extraordinaire James Wong had actually seen anything like this prior to, to which he responded : “No!” prior to keeping in mind that he isn’t sure how a frozen apple would rot and fall out of the casing like that.

A few of you might be questioning if this is too great to be real. Are they legally genuine things, or is this a rather marvelous deception? At this moment, I can’t state for sure. If there are any horticulturalists out there that may have any insight regarding how these apples formed, or how unusual the set of scenarios require to be for ghost apples to appear, please do contact us.

Sietsema, who studied gardening himself at Michigan State University, stated that he comprehends that the photos may provoke some hesitation since they are definitely rather unusual. Stating that, he states that he makes sure it’s taken place previously, however included that “most pruners are difficult at work rather of taking photos like me.”

.

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