It's a Planet Party! See Venus, Saturn and Jupiter with the Moon This Weekend

Skywatchers must watch out for a world celebration in the early morning sky this Friday and Saturday (March 2 to 3).

Credit: Starry Night software application

This weekend, a dazzling display screen of planetary things will impress you– if you can get up prior to the sun increases. Venus will be shining amazingly next to Saturn, Jupiter and the crescent moon This fantastic phenomenon will start on Friday (March 1) when the crescent moon will remain in combination with Saturn and continue into Saturday (March 2), when the moon will remain in combination with Venus.

Skywatchers in the Northern Hemisphere will have a fantastic view of this planetary celebration in the sky if they’re awake prior to dawn. If you remain in this area and you search for at the sky about an hour prior to dawn on Friday, you will have the ability to see the moon make a close technique to Saturn, with Venus and Jupiter shining vibrantly close by. For those with an eager eye for constellations, you will discover the moon and Saturn nestled in the constellation Sagittarius, with Venus hovering to their left at the border in between Sagittarius and Capricornus

Throughout the crescent moon’s combination with Saturn, skywatchers will discover Saturn snuggling up near to the moon, though Venus will be the second-brightest things in the sky (after the moon). Throughout the moon’s combination with Venus the following early morning, the set will be close together and near to the horizon, with Venus continuing to radiance remarkably and the subsiding moon appearing somewhat thinner than previously.

Related: When, Where and How to See the Planets in the 2019 Night Sky

Saturn will make a close approach to the moon on Friday, March 1, at 1:28 p.m. EST (1828 GMT). Skywatchers in the U.S. won't be able to see the pair at that time of day, but early risers can enjoy the view before dawn. This sky map shows where the planets will be as seen from New York City at 5:30 a.m. local time, or about an hour before sunrise.

Saturn will make a close technique to the moon on Friday, March 1, at 1: 28 p.m. EST (1828 GMT). Skywatchers in the U.S. will not have the ability to see the set at that time of day, however early birds can take pleasure in the view prior to dawn. This sky map reveals where the worlds will be as seen from New york city City at 5: 30 a.m. regional time, or about an hour prior to dawn.

Credit: Starry Night software application

Throughout this planetary dance on Friday, the 25- day-old moon will remain in combination with Saturn at 1: 28 p.m. EST (1828 GMT), going by at 0.3 degrees to the north of the ringed world, according to the skywatching site In-The-Sky. org On Saturday, the moon will pass 1.2 degrees to the south of Venus, making its closest technique at 4: 29 p.m. EST (2129 GMT).

Although skywatchers in the U.S. will not have the ability to see the worlds at the specific minute of the combinations, the view will be simply as great in the early morning prior to the daytime cleans them out. Nevertheless, Venus and Saturn will be relatively near to the horizon at dawn and might be blocked by high structures, trees or mountains. To find out precisely what time each of the worlds will increase from your area, take a look at timeanddate.com’s astronomy calculator

Venus will be in conjunction with the moon on Saturday, March 2, at 4:29 p.m. EST (2129 GMT). It will be below the horizon for skywatchers in the U.S. at that time, but it will appear close to the moon before sunrise. Look for them above the southeast horizon; the moon will be in the constellation Sagittarius, and Venus will be to its left in the constellation Capricornus.

Venus will remain in combination with the moon on Saturday, March 2, at 4: 29 p.m. EST (2129 GMT). It will be listed below the horizon for skywatchers in the U.S. at that time, however it will appear near to the moon prior to dawn. Search for them above the southeast horizon; the moon will remain in the constellation Sagittarius, and Venus will be to its left in the constellation Capricornus.

Credit: Starry Night software application

On Friday, the moon will be shining at a magnitude of -108, and Saturn at magnitude 0.4 (on the scale of outstanding magnitude, bigger worths represent brighter things). On Saturday, the moon will be somewhat dimmer at magnitude -103, and Venus at mag -4.1, making Venus and the moon the 2 brightest things in the sky. In reality, Venus will be so brilliant that you may even have the ability to see Venus hanging out near the moon after the sun is up. Jupiter will be the third-brightest things in the sky prior to dawn that early morning. Saturn, the dimmest of these noticeable worlds, will be noticeably shining in between Jupiter and Venus till the sun cleans it out.

For telescope fiends, it may be hard to see all of these things through the lens of a telescope, given that they will be too far apart. However with the naked eye or perhaps through a set of field glasses, skywatchers can get an unbelievable eyeful this upcoming weekend.

Editor’s note: If you recorded a fantastic night sky picture and wish to share it with Space.com for a story or gallery, send out images and remarks to handling editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

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