A JAMA study compared vaccine effectiveness in kids who had and had not gotten the flu vaccine the prior year. (Photo: Getty Images)

Getting a flu vaccine is like wearing underwear. Just because you did it last year, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it this year.

Also, similar to underwear, the protection offered by a flu vaccine does not last forever. While the duration of protection can vary significantly from person to person, in some cases, the protection may wear off in 6 months or so, which is still much longer than you should wear a pair of underwear. That’s one reason why you should get a flu vaccine every year, assuming that you are 6 months and older because you can read this and you don’t have a medical reason (e.g., life threatening allergy) to not get the vaccine.

Another reason is that strains of the flu virus are like reality television stars. Different ones come and go from year to year. Therefore, the strains in a flu vaccine and thus the strains that you end up being protected against vary from year to year.

And if you are worried that getting the flu vaccine every year will somehow reduce your immunity against the flu, look at the study just published in JAMA. In fact, don’t just look at it, read it. For the study, a research team recruited kids who had visited outpatient clinics at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, Texas), the Marshfield Clinic Research Institute (Marshfield, Wisconsin), the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, Tennessee), and Wake Forest School of Medicine (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) during the 2013-2014, 2014-2015, and 2015-2016 flu seasons. In order to qualify for the study, a kid had to have a fever and an acute respiratory illness and be real kids (ages 2 to 17 years) instead of just really immature adults. The research team ended up enrolling 3369 children in the study. Each kid received a flu test. The researchers checked whether each kid had received the flu vaccine the prior year. This allowed the researchers to divide the kids into 4 groups, based on whether they had received the flu vaccine the enrollment year and the year prior:

  • Received the vaccine both the enrollment year and the prior year.
  • Received the vaccine just the enrollment year
  • Received the vaccine only the prior year.
  • Did not receive the vaccine either year

About 23% (or 772) of the kids ended up testing positive for influenza. Around half (or 1674) had received the flu vaccine. The kids could have received one of two different types of flu vaccine each year: the one with the live but weakened virus that is squirted up your nose and the one with the dead virus that is injected into your arm.

The Flumist vaccine is back this year. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images)

The researchers tried to estimate the effectiveness of the flu vaccine by comparing the percentage of people who ended up testing positive for influenza among those who got the vaccine versus those who did not get the vaccine during enrollment year. Of course, this is a somewhat indirect way to estimate the effectiveness of the flu vaccine. Plus, kids visiting a clinic for a fever and respiratory illness do not necessarily represent the general population.

Nonetheless, the study found no evidence that getting the vaccine the prior year reduced the effectiveness of the vaccine the subsequent year. In other words, based on the study results, getting the vaccine last year won’t make the vaccine less effective and you more likely to get the flu this year. In fact, the study results suggested that getting the vaccine the prior year may help further boost the vaccine’s protection against the certain types of influenza, the B types.

So, why not get the flu vaccine each and every year, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends? And change your underwear much, much more frequently. If you want to maximize your immunity against the flu, you have to get the vaccine each and every year. There is just no other scientifically proven way to substantially boost your immunity against this virus that could potentially kill you no matter how healthy you may be. Sure, keeping healthy by eating well and staying physically active can help to some degree. But a supplement, a particular food item, or magic potion will not offer you the same immunity against the flu that a vaccine can. Don’t listen to those selling supplements who are making claims of protection against the flu that have no real supporting scientific evidence. Like underwear that’s been on too long, a lot of the bogus flu protection claims out there can get pretty stinky.

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(********* )A JAMA research study compared vaccine efficiency in kids who had and had actually not gotten the influenza vaccine the previous year. ( Picture: Getty Images)

Getting an influenza vaccine resembles using underclothing. Even if you did it in 2015, does not suggest you should not do it this year.(********** )(************

) Likewise, comparable to underclothing, the security used by an influenza vaccine does not last permanently. While the period of security can differ substantially from individual to individual, in many cases, the security might wear away in 6 months or two, which is still a lot longer than you need to use a set of underclothing. That’s one reason you need to get an influenza vaccine every year, presuming that you are 6 months and older since you can read this and you do not have a medical factor (e.g., harmful allergic reaction) to not get the vaccine.

Another factor is that stress of the influenza infection resemble truth tv stars. Various ones reoccur from year to year. For that reason, the stress in an influenza vaccine and hence the stress that you wind up being safeguarded versus differ from year to year.

And if you are stressed that getting the influenza vaccine every year will in some way minimize your resistance versus the influenza, take a look at the research study simply released in JAMA In reality, do not simply take a look at it, read it. For the research study, a research study group hired kids who had actually gone to outpatient centers at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, Texas), the Marshfield Center Research Study Institute (Marshfield, Wisconsin), the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, Tennessee), and Wake Forest School of Medication (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) throughout the 2013-2014, 2014-2015, and 2015-2016 influenza seasons. In order to get approved for the research study, a kid needed to have a fever and an intense breathing disease and be genuine kids (ages 2 to 17 years) rather of simply actually immature grownups. The research study group wound up register 3369 kids in the research study. Each kid got an influenza test. The scientists inspected whether each kid had actually gotten the influenza vaccine the previous year. This permitted the scientists to divide the kids into 4 groups, based upon whether they had actually gotten the influenza vaccine the registration year and the year prior:

(******************* )

  • Got the vaccine both the registration year and the previous year.
  • Got the vaccine simply the registration year
  • Got the vaccine just the previous year.
  • Did not get the vaccine either year
  • About23%( or772) of the kids wound up screening favorable for influenza. Around half (or(**************************************** )) had actually gotten the influenza vaccine. The kids might have gotten one of 2 various kinds of influenza vaccine each year: the one with the live however weakened infection that is sprayed up your nose and the one with the dead infection that is injected into your arm. (********** )(*********************** )

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    )

    The Flumist vaccine is back this year. (Picture by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register through Getty Images)

    The scientists attempted to approximate the efficiency of the influenza vaccine by comparing the portion of individuals who wound up screening favorable for influenza amongst those who got the vaccine versus those who did not get the vaccine throughout registration year. Naturally, this is a rather indirect method to approximate the efficiency of the influenza vaccine. Plus, kids checking out a center for a fever and breathing disease do not always represent the basic population.

    Nevertheless, the research study discovered no proof that getting the vaccine the previous year decreased the efficiency of the vaccine the subsequent year. Simply put, based upon the research study results, getting the vaccine in 2015 will not make the vaccine less efficient and you most likely to get the influenza this year. In reality, the research study results recommended that getting the vaccine the previous year might assist even more increase the vaccine’s security versus the specific kinds of influenza, the B types.

    So, why not get the influenza vaccine each and every year, as the Centers for Illness Control and Avoidance (CDC) suggests? And alter your underclothing much, a lot more often. If you wish to optimize your resistance versus the influenza, you need to get the vaccine each and every year. There is simply no other clinically tested method to significantly increase your resistance versus this infection that might possibly eliminate you no matter how healthy you might be. Sure, keeping healthy by consuming well and remaining physically active can assist to some degree. However a supplement, a specific food product, or cure-all will not provide you the exact same resistance versus the influenza that a vaccine can. Do not listen to those offering supplements who are making claims of security versus the influenza that have no genuine supporting clinical proof. Like underclothing that’s been on too long, a great deal of the fake influenza security declares out there can get quite smelly.

    ” readability =”79
    298392283″ >

    .

    .

    A JAMA research study compared vaccine efficiency in kids who had and had actually not gotten the influenza vaccine the previous year. (Picture: Getty Images)

    .

    .

    Getting an influenza vaccine resembles using underclothing. Even if you did it in 2015, does not suggest you should not do it this year.

    Likewise, comparable to underclothing, the security used by an influenza vaccine does not last permanently. While the period of security can differ substantially from individual to individual, in many cases, the security might wear away in 6 months or two, which is still a lot longer than you need to use a set of underclothing. That’s one reason you need to get an influenza vaccine every year, presuming that you are 6 months and older since you can read this and you do not have a medical factor (e.g., harmful allergic reaction) to not get the vaccine.

    Another factor is that stress of the influenza infection resemble truth tv stars. Various ones reoccur from year to year. For that reason, the stress in an influenza vaccine and hence the stress that you wind up being safeguarded versus differ from year to year.

    And if you are stressed that getting the influenza vaccine every year will in some way minimize your resistance versus the influenza, take a look at the research study simply released in JAMA In reality, do not simply take a look at it, read it. For the research study, a research study group hired kids who had actually gone to outpatient centers at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, Texas), the Marshfield Center Research Study Institute (Marshfield, Wisconsin), the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, Tennessee), and Wake Forest School of Medication (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) throughout the 2013 – 2014, 2014 – 2015, and 2015 – 2016 influenza seasons. In order to get approved for the research study, a kid needed to have a fever and an intense breathing disease and be genuine kids (ages 2 to 17 years) rather of simply actually immature grownups. The research study group wound up register 3369 kids in the research study. Each kid got an influenza test. The scientists inspected whether each kid had actually gotten the influenza vaccine the previous year. This permitted the scientists to divide the kids into 4 groups, based upon whether they had actually gotten the influenza vaccine the registration year and the year prior:

      .

    • Got the vaccine both the registration year and the previous year.
    • Got the vaccine simply the registration year
    • Got the vaccine just the previous year.
    • Did not get the vaccine either year

    .

    About 23 % (or 772) of the kids wound up screening favorable for influenza. Around half (or 1674) had actually gotten the influenza vaccine. The kids might have gotten one of 2 various kinds of influenza vaccine each year: the one with the live however weakened infection that is sprayed up your nose and the one with the dead infection that is injected into your arm.

    .

    .

    The Flumist vaccine is back this year. (Picture by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register through Getty Images)

    .

    .

    The scientists attempted to approximate the efficiency of the influenza vaccine by comparing the portion of individuals who wound up screening favorable for influenza amongst those who got the vaccine versus those who did not get the vaccine throughout registration year. Naturally, this is a rather indirect method to approximate the efficiency of the influenza vaccine. Plus, kids checking out a center for a fever and breathing disease do not always represent the basic population.

    Nevertheless, the research study discovered no proof that getting the vaccine the previous year decreased the efficiency of the vaccine the subsequent year. Simply put, based upon the research study results, getting the vaccine in 2015 will not make the vaccine less efficient and you most likely to get the influenza this year. In reality, the research study results recommended that getting the vaccine the previous year might assist even more increase the vaccine’s security versus the specific kinds of influenza, the B types.

    So, why not get the influenza vaccine each and every year, as the Centers for Illness Control and Avoidance (CDC) suggests ? And alter your underclothing much, a lot more often. If you wish to optimize your resistance versus the influenza, you need to get the vaccine each and every year. There is simply no other clinically tested method to significantly increase your resistance versus this infection that might possibly eliminate you no matter how healthy you might be. Sure, keeping healthy by consuming well and remaining physically active can assist to some degree. However a supplement, a specific food product, or cure-all will not provide you the exact same resistance versus the influenza that a vaccine can. Do not listen to those offering supplements who are making claims of security versus the influenza that have no genuine supporting clinical proof. Like underclothing that’s been on too long, a great deal of the fake influenza security declares out there can get quite smelly.

    .