Here is an illustration of the Demodex mite. (Photo: Getty Images)

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This might not be the most comforting news, but mites could be having sex on your face. Maybe not right now, but more likely while you are asleep. Let this thought percolate in your mind the next time you think you are going to bed alone.

A video posted on YouTube this week by KQED, a PBS station based in the San Francisco Bay Area, may help you face the facts about Demodex mites. These mites are tiny (less than a half-millimeter long) eight-legged creatures that live on and in your face. During the day, they hang out inside your hair follicles. That’s because, unlike Spencer Pratt and Heidi Montag, these mites don’t like the lights.

While in your hair follicles, they feast on oily stuff. No, not fries and cheesesteaks, but sebum, the substance produced by your sebaceous glands. Your skin secretes sebum to protect itself and keep it moist, but apparently it is also quite yummy to these mites. That’s why if you want to find these mites: grease is the word. They tend to live where your skin is the greasiest. The two most common Demodex species found on humans are Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis. 

Eating sebum is not the only thing that these parasites do. If you’ve run out of romantic comedies to watch, watch the KQED Deep Look video:

Ah, nothing like mite romance. As the video shows, at night, they climb out onto the surface of your skin and make whoopee or do it like they do on the Discovery Channel. Then they move back into your pores to lay their eggs. If the thought of all these mites making sexy time on your face makes you want to put a cheese grater to your face, don’t. That won’t help and will only make matters worse. There’s currently no way to extract all of these mites from your face. Try as you might.

As the Deep Look video explains, you aren’t born with these mites on you. Rather, your parents or caregivers probably transfer mites to you when they rubbed their mite-ridden faces on yours. Yet another thing to thank your Mom and Dad for giving you.

Here is some more computer artwork of Demodex mites climbing out of an eyelash hair follicle. (Photo: Getty Images)

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If you are wondering whether this mite has an anus, the KQED video answers that question as well. The answer is no, this mite does not have an anus. Thus, at least, these mites don’t poop on your face. But they do die and decompose on your face after their two weeks or so of life. Therefore, in their relatively short lives, they basically eat your oil, have sex, lay eggs, and don’t poop.

Fortunately, most of the time, these mites do not seem to cause much trouble. Some studies have suggested that they may be associated with acne or rosacea, but like a mite trying to ride a bicycle, the evidence is shaky. Usually your immune system can keep your mite population relatively in check. However, if your immune system is weakened, your mite population might increase and even explode. In greater numbers, they may be more likely to cause inflammation, itching, and other skin problems.

There is still much to learn about these tiny critters. Might they have some beneficial purpose? Might they have other effects, either positive or negative, on your health and the health of your skin? Might they be evolving over the years? The KQED Deep Look video is yet another reminder that you are never really alone. Instead, your body is like Los Angeles. It’s got millions of different inhabitants, doing all sorts of things, including mating. Some of these inhabitants are well known. Others are not.

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Here is an illustration of the Demodex mite.( Image: Getty Images)

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This may not be the most soothing news, however termites might be making love on your face. Perhaps not right now, however most likely while you are asleep. Let this idea percolate in your mind the next time you believe you are going to sleep alone.

A video published on YouTube today by KQED, a PBS station based in the San Francisco Bay Location, might assist you deal with the realities about Demodex termites. These termites are small (less than a half-millimeter long) eight-legged animals that reside on and in your face. Throughout the day, they hang out inside your hair roots. That’s because, unlike Spencer Pratt and Heidi Montag, these termites do not like the lights.

While in your hair roots, they delight in oily things. No, not french fries and cheesesteaks, however sebum, the compound produced by your sebaceous glands. Your skin produces sebum to secure itself and keep it damp, however obviously it is likewise rather tasty to these termites. That’s why if you wish to discover these termites: grease is the word. They tend to live where your skin is the greasiest. The 2 most typical Demodex types discovered on human beings are Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis.

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Consuming sebum is not the only thing that these parasites do.(*************** )If you have actually lacked romantic funnies to enjoy, enjoy the KQED Deep Appearance video:

Ah, absolutely nothing like mite love. As the video reveals, in the evening, they climb up out onto the surface area of your skin and make whoopee or do it like they do on the Discovery Channel Then they return into your pores to lay their eggs. If the idea of all these termites making hot time on your face makes you wish to put a cheese grater to your face, do not. That will not assist and will just make matters worse. There’s presently no chance to draw out all of these termites from your face. Attempt as you might.

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As the Deep Appearance video describes, you aren’t born with these termites on you. Rather, your moms and dads or caretakers most likely move termites to you when they rubbed their mite-ridden faces on yours. Yet another thing to thank your Mother and father for providing you.

(******* )(******** )Here is some more computer system art work of Demodex termites climbing up out of an eyelash hair roots. (Image: Getty Images)

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